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County working on agreement to protect roads from wind turbine development

County leaders are working on an agreement with a wind turbine developer that will cover the costs of damage to any county or township roads. Innogy SE plans to begin site preparations for Scioto Ridge Project, most of which is in southern Hardin County.

turbines

Innogy SE’s Jason Dagger introduces himself to the Logan County Commissioners prior to a Thursday meeting regarding a draft agreement to protect the county’s road infrastructure. (EXAMINER PHOTO | JOEL E. MAST)


However, much of the gravel and concrete is expected to come out of Logan County and there are plans to put up around eight turbines near Belle Center.

Jason Dagger with Innogy said state regulators approved the project for 172 turbines, but the project has been scaled back to no more than 107.

He expects there will be much less than that built.

He spoke Thursday before the Logan County Commissioners, Logan County Prosecutor Eric Stewart, Logan County Engineer ScottColeman and about two dozen opponents of wind turbines.

They continue to fear the turbines will destroy their quality of life and hurt property values.

Local officials cannot stop the development nor do they have control over the project. They can, however, develop an agreement to protect the county’s investment in roads.

Stewart said the draft copy will require Innogy to repair any damage linked to the project. It also has a schedule of fines.

Coleman and his staff will make visual records of the roads in the area and will rely on citizens and law enforcement to report any truckers who damage the roads hauling materials for the wind turbine project.

Innogy also will pay the costs for an inspection and a monitor team of Coleman’s choosing.

Coleman also noted any repairs will have to meet his office’s standards.

Dagger said the $300 million project will be completed in 2020.

This year will focus on the infrastructure and turbine site development followed by turbines going up in the spring and summer of 2020.

Once up, there will be a full-time staff of eight to 10 technicians based in the area to maintain the turbines.

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