A look at intelligence briefings for presidential candidates

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Harry S. Truman, who became president on April 12, 1945, upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, didn't learn about the Manhattan Project to develop an atomic bomb until his 12th day in office. Vowing never to leave another president uninformed, Truman began the practice of giving presidential nominees intelligence briefings to prepare them for the demands of the job. A look at how some of them went:

  • Written by DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press

Domestic violence accusations often leave permanent damage

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fans can be deeply forgiving, willing to look past their favorite star's terrible drug addiction, ugly custody battle or ignorant remarks. But accusations of domestic violence often leave a lasting impression on a celebrity's image. Chris Brown may be winning Grammys, but nobody's forgotten what happened with Rihanna.

  • Written by SANDY COHEN, AP Entertainment Writer

Atomic bomb survivors feel wonder, doubt after Obama visit

HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — The survivors of the world's first atomic bomb attack are used to hearing grand vows to rid the world of nuclear weapons. They just don't usually come directly from the leader of the country that dropped the bomb on them in the first place.

  • Written by FOSTER KLUG, Associated Press KAORI HITOMI, Associated Press