Poor offenders pay high price when probation turns on profit

MURFREESBORO, Tennessee (AP) — When Steven Gibbs couldn't afford the fees demanded by the company supervising his probation, he wound up in jail. When Gibbs — who had been arrested for driving on a suspended license — failed a drug test the company charged him to take, he was jailed again.

  • Written by ADAM GELLER, AP National Writers SHARON COHEN, AP National Writers

Essay: Will the First Amendment survive the information age?

Publishable Editors Notes: One of several stories by The Associated Press, McClatchy and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel marking Sunshine Week, an annual celebration of access to public information.

As Apple tries to fend off government demands for access to iPhone content, the company is leaning on free speech arguments as a key part of its defense in a California courtroom.

  • Written by ANDERS GYLLENHAAL

Even as political spending explodes, disclosure remains hazy

 

Publishable Editors Notes: One of several stories by The Associated Press, McClatchy and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel marking Sunshine Week, an annual celebration of access to public information

Politicians in Mississippi have used campaign money to pay for such things as a BMW, an RV and $800 cowboy boots.

  • Written by MARY SPICUZZA, JEREMY B. WHITE