Times, New Yorker win Pulitzer for Weinstein scandal

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times and The New Yorker won the Pulitzer Prize for public service Monday for breaking the Harvey Weinstein scandal with reporting that galvanized the #MeToo movement and set off a worldwide reckoning over sexual misconduct in the workplace.

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Beginning third from left, New York Times staff writers Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, senior enterprise editor Rebecca Corbett and reporter Cara Buckley celebrate with colleagues in the newsroom in New York after the team they led won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service on Monday, April 16, 2018. The Times shared the prize with Ronan Farrow of The New Yorker for their reporting on sexual harassment that ushered in a reckoning about the treatment of women by powerful men in the uppermost ranks of Hollywood, politics, media and technology. (Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times via AP)


The Times and The Washington Post took the award in the national reporting category for their coverage of Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and contacts between President Donald Trump's campaign and Russian officials.

The Press Democrat of Santa Rosa, California, received the breaking news reporting award for coverage of the wildfires that swept through California wine country last fall, killing 44 people and destroying thousands of homes.

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Santa Rosa Press Democrat Executive Editor Catherine Barnett, right and reporter Randi Rossmann, left, celebrate Monday, April 16, 2018, in Santa Rosa, Calif, after the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting was awarded to the staff of the newspaper for their coverage of the October wildfires in Sonoma County. (Kent Porter/The Press Democrat via AP)


The Washington Post also won the investigative reporting prize for revealing decades-old allegations of sexual misconduct against Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama. The Republican former judge denied the accusations, but they figured heavily in Doug Jones' victory as the first Democrat elected to the Senate from the state in decades.

One of the biggest surprises of the day came in the non-journalism categories when rap star Kendrick Lamar was awarded the Pulitzer for music, becoming the first non-classical or non-jazz artist to win the prize.

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This cover image released by Interscope Records shows "Damn." by Kendrick Lamar. On Monday, April 16, 2018, Lamar won the Pulitzer Prize for music for his album. (Interscope Records via AP)


The Pulitzers, American journalism's most prestigious awards, reflected a year of unrelenting news and unprecedented challenges for U.S. media, as Trump repeatedly branded reporting "fake news" and called journalists "the enemy of the people."

The New York Times won three Pulitzers and The Washington Post and Reuters received two apiece.

In announcing the journalism prizes, Pulitzer administrator Dana Canedy said the winners "uphold the highest purpose of a free and independent press, even in the most trying of times."

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Dana Canedy, the new administrator of The Pulitzer Prizes, announces the 2018 winners, Monday April 16, 2018, at Columbia University in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)


"Their work is real news of the highest order, executed nobly, as journalism was always intended, without fear or favor," she said.

A string of stories in The Times and The Washington Post shined a light on Russian interference in the presidential election and its possible connections to the Trump campaign and transition — ties now under investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller. The president has called the investigation a "witch hunt."

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Washington Post National Politics Deputy Editor Peter Wallsten, center left, accompanied by National Security Editor Peter Finn, center right, and Executive Editor Marty Baron, right, speaks to the newsroom after The Washington Post wins two pulitzer prizes, Monday, April 16, 2018, in Washington. The Post shared a Pulitzer with the New York Times for their coverage of Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and contacts between President Donald Trump's campaign and Russian officials, and won a second Pulitzer for uncovering the decades-old allegations of sexual misconduct against Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)


The Pulitzer judges commended the two newspapers for "deeply sourced, relentlessly reported coverage in the public interest."

In stories that appeared within days of each other in October, The Times and The New Yorker reported that movie mogul Weinstein faced allegations of sexual harassment and assault from a multitude of women in Hollywood and had secretly paid settlements to keep the claims from becoming public.

The Pulitzer judges said The Times' reporters, led by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, and The New Yorker's Ronan Farrow produced "explosive, impactful journalism that exposed powerful and wealthy sexual predators" and forced the issue of sexual abuse into the open.

"By revealing secret settlements, persuading victims to speak and bringing powerful men to account, we spurred a worldwide reckoning about sexual abuse that only seems to be growing," New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet said in remarks to the newsroom.

"People have been saying for decades that this kind of behavior is endemic in society," New Yorker editor David Remnick said, adding that he hoped the stories would "help not only bring it to light but change the culture."

Weinstein was ousted from the studio he co-founded and now faces criminal investigations in New York and Los Angeles. He has apologized for "the way I've behaved with colleagues in the past" but denied any non-consensual sexual contact.

The stories' impact spread beyond Weinstein to allegations against other powerful men in entertainment, politics and other fields, toppling such figures as "Today" show host Matt Lauer, actor Kevin Spacey, newsman Charlie Rose and Sen. Al Franken. Men and women, famous or not, have spoken about their own experiences with sexual harassment and assault in what has become known as the #MeToo movement.

"This moment gets called a reckoning, but we just started telling the truth about old abuses of power," Farrow tweeted Monday.

Weinstein spokeswoman Holly Baird declined to comment on the Pulitzer except to suggest similar recognition should be given to Tarana Burke, an activist who founded the #MeToo movement on Twitter about a decade ago to raise awareness of sexual violence.

In other categories, the Arizona Republic and USA Today Network won the explanatory reporting prize for a multi-format look at the challenges and consequences of building the Mexican border wall that was a centerpiece of Trump's campaign. The project included footage from a helicopter flight along the entire 2,000-mile border.

The local reporting award went to The Cincinnati Enquirer for what the judges called "a riveting and insightful" narrative and video about the heroin epidemic in the area. More than four dozen reporters and photographers dove into the drug's toll over one week.

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Cincinnati Enquirer reporter Amber Hunt, right, and other Enquirer staff celebrate, Monday, April 16, 2018, in Cincinnati, as they learn the newspaper won the Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting for "Seven Days of Heroin," a week-long examination of the many ways the heroin crisis is impacting their community. (Cara Owsley/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP)


Clare Baldwin, Andrew R.C. Marshall and Manuel Mogato of Reuters won the international reporting award for their coverage of Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte's deadly crackdown on drugs, and the news agency's photographers received the feature photography prize for their images of the plight of Rohingya refugees who have fled Myanmar.

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This Nov. 5, 2017, photo provided by The Pulitzer Prizes, taken by Reuters photographer Adnan Abidi, was part of a group of photos on the plight of the Rohingya that won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for feature photography. In the photo, Mohammed Shoaib, 7, who was shot in his chest before crossing the border from Myanmar in August 2017, is held by his father outside a medical centre near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters/The Pulitzer Prizes via AP)


The breaking news photography award went to Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress of Charlottesville, Virginia, who captured the moment a car plowed into counter-protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in the college town. The car killed counter-demonstrator Heather Heyer.

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In this Aug. 12, 2017, photo by Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress, people fly into the air as a car drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. The photo won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography, announced Monday, April 16, 2018, at Columbia University in New York. (Ryan Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)


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This undated photo shows Ryan Kelly, a photojournalist for The Daily Progress in Charlottesville, Va. Kelly won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for his photo of a car driving into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville on Aug. 12, 2017. The prize was announced on Monday, April 16, 2018, at Columbia University in New York. (Zack Wajsgras/The Daily Progress via AP)

Kelly made the photo on his last day at the newspaper before moving on to a job at a brewery. In a text Monday, Kelly described the prize as an "incredible honor" but added: "Mostly I'm still heartbroken for Heather Heyer's family and everybody else who was affected by that tragic violence."

Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, a freelance writer for GQ magazine, took the feature writing award for a profile of Dylann Roof, the avowed white supremacist convicted of killing nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina.

The commentary award went to John Archibald of Alabama Media Group in Birmingham, Alabama, for pieces on politics, women's rights and other topics. Art critic Jerry Saltz of New York magazine won the criticism award .

Andie Dominick of The Des Moines Register received the editorial writing prizefor pieces about the consequences of privatizing Iowa's administration of Medicaid.

Freelance writer Jake Halpern and freelance cartoonist Michael Sloan were awarded the editorial cartooning prize for a graphic narrative in The New York Times about a family of refugees fearing deportation.

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This image, provided by The Pulitzer Prizes, shows a cartoon by Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan of The New York Times that was part of a series that won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. The Pulitzer committee described the work as "an emotionally powerful series, told in graphic narrative form, that chronicled the daily struggles of a real-life family of refugees and its fear of deportation." (Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan/The New York Times/The Pulitzer Prizes via AP)


The Pulitzers were announced at Columbia University, which administers the prizes. This is the 102nd year of the contest, established by newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer.

Winners of the public service award receive a gold medal; the other awards carry a prize of $15,000 each.

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Associated Press writers Justin Lynch and Colleen Long in New York and Ben Finley in Norfolk, Virginia, contributed to this report.


2018 Pulitzer winners and finalists in journalism and arts

NEW YORK (AP) — The 2017 Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists:

JOURNALISM

Public Service

The New York Times and The New Yorker for stories about disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and other powerful men who have been accused of sexual harassment and abuse. The citation notes the reporting by the Times' Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey and Ronan Farrow of The New Yorker has spurred "a worldwide reckoning about sexual abuse of women."

Also nominated as a finalist: The Kansas City Star for stories about the Kansas government's "obsession with secrecy" and lack of transparency in numerous areas, including law enforcement and child welfare services.

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Breaking News Reporting

The Press-Democrat in Santa Rosa, California, for coverage of devastating wildfires.

Also nominated as finalists: The Houston Chronicle for its coverage of Hurricane Harvey and The New York Times for its coverage of the Las Vegas mass shooting.

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Investigative Reporting

The Washington Post for its coverage of sexual harassment allegations against Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Also nominated as finalists: The Miami Herald for an investigation of Florida's juvenile justice system by reporters Carol Marbin Miller and Audra D.S. Burch, and Tim Eberly of The Virginian-Pilot for reporting that changed the state's secretive parole board.

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Explanatory Reporting

The Arizona Republic and USA Today Network for multimedia reporting including podcasts and virtual reality that examined President Donald Trump's proposal to construct a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Also nominated as finalists: Michael Kimmelman of The New York Times for a series on climate change, and the staff of ProPublica for its reporting on the United States' high rate of maternal deaths and why many of them are preventable.

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Local Reporting

The Cincinnati Enquirer for stories on the city's heroin epidemic.

Also nominated as finalists: The Chicago Tribune's Jason Grotto, Sandhya Kambhampati and Ray Long and ProPublica Illinois for an examination of 100 million tax records that showed systematic neglect of majority black and Latino neighborhoods, and The Boston Globe for stories that showed how racism had infiltrated all aspects of life in the city.

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National Reporting

The New York Times and The Washington Post for their deeply-sourced stories on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Also nominated as finalists: Amy Julia Harris and Shoshana Walter of Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting for stories on practices in several states that steered defendants into private drug rehabs that functioned as work camps, and Brett Murphy of USA Today Network for reports on truckers who haul goods from America's ports.

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International Reporting

Reuters reporters Clare Baldwin, Andrew R.C. Marshall and Manuel Mogato for their reports on killings made during Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs.

Also nominated as finalists: The Associated Press for its coverage of the U.S.-led campaign that led to the liberation of Mosul from Islamic State control, and Buzzfeed News for stories on how operatives with apparent ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin had killed perceived enemies in Britain and the United States.

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Feature Writing

Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, a freelance reporter for GQ for her profile on Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof.

Also nominated as finalists: John Woodrow Cox of The Washington Post for stories about gun violence told through the eyes of children, and Norimitsu Onishi of The New York Times for the final days of Japan's isolated elderly population.

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Commentary

John Archibald of the Alabama Media Group for his columns that called out hypocrisy, corrupt politicians and championed the rights of women.

Also nominated as finalists: Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker for her commentary on race, and Steve Lopez of the Los Angeles Times for his columns on California's housing crisis.

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Criticism

Jerry Saltz of New York magazine for his work on visual art in America.

Also nominated as finalists: Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post for his books on criticism, and Manohla Dargis of The New York Times for columns about the exploitation of women in Hollywood.

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Editorial Writing

Andie Dominick of The Des Moines Register for editorials on damaging consequences of the state's privatization of Medicaid.

Also nominated as finalists: The New York Times for a nine-part series on why people with a history of domestic violence should be restricted from having guns, and Sharon Grigsby of The Dallas Morning News for editorials on Baylor University's response to sexual assault on campus.

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Editorial Cartooning

Jake Halpern, freelance writer and Michael Sloan, freelance cartoonist for a graphic series published by The New York Times on the struggles of a family of refugees living with the fear of deportation.

Also nominated as finalists: Mark Fiore, freelance cartoonist, for his animated editorial cartoons, and Mike Thompson of the Detroit Free Press for cartoons on a variety of social issues.

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Breaking News Photography

Ryan Kelly of The Daily Progress in Charlottesville, Virginia, for his image of a driver plowing through demonstrators.

Also nominated as a finalist: Ivor Prickett, a freelance photographer whose images for The New York Times showed the impact of survivors of war in Mosul and Raqqa.

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Feature Photography

Reuters for its photographs that showed the violence experienced by the Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar.

Also nominated as finalists: Kevin Frayer, freelance photographer for Getty Images, who also documented the Rohingya crisis; Lisa Krantz of the San Antonio Express-News for her images of a boy battling an incurable disorder; and Meridith Kohut, a freelance photographer who documented the starvation of children in Venezuela for The New York Times.

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LETTERS, DRAMA AND MUSIC

Fiction

"Less," by Andrew Sean Greer

Also nominated as finalists: "In the Distance," by Hernan Diaz and "The Idiot," by Elif Batuman

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Drama

"Cost of Living," by Martyna Majok

Also nominated as finalists: "Everybody," by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and "The Minutes," by Tracy Letts

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History

"The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea," by Jack E. Davis

Also nominated as finalists: "Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics," by Kim Phillips-Fein and "Hitler in Los Angeles: How Jews Foiled Nazi Plots Against Hollywood and America," by Steven J. Ross

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Biography or Autobiography

"Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder," by Caroline Fraser

Also nominated as finalists: "Richard Nixon: The Life," by John A. Farrell and "Robert Lowell, Setting the River on Fire: A Study of Genius, Mania, and Character," by Kay Redfield Jamison

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Poetry

"Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016," by Frank Bidart

Also nominated as finalists: "Incendiary Art," by Patricia Smith and "semiautomatic," by Evie Shockley

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General Nonfiction

"Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America," by James Forman Jr.

Also nominated as finalists: "Notes on a Foreign Country: America Abroad in a Post-America World" by Suzy Hansen and "The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin's Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World — and Us," by Richard O. Prum

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Music

"DAMN.," by Kendrick Lamar.

Also nominated as finalists: "Quartet," by Michael Gilbertson and "Sound from the Bench," by Ted Hearne.