Washington Post’s Saslow burned Flag City

TJ HubbardA town not an hour north of Bellefontaine was recently attacked, and it’s possible you don’t know anything about it. No bombs fell and there were no human casualties, but a community was put under fire, nevertheless.

On June 30, an article by Eli Saslow, “In Flag City USA, False Obama Rumors Are Flying,” appeared on the front page of the Washington Post. It unfairly damaged the reputation and assassinated the character of Findlay and its citizens. This is to say nothing of the fact that Saslow’s story flies far afield of good journalism, and his editors ought to be fired for allowing it to run on the front page.

 

You don’t have to take my word for it. Below, the article is reproduced in its entirety. Please feel free to form your own opinions about it. But first, for your consideration, here are some of the questions that I had after reading the piece:

Indians making right move with Sabathia

Matt HammondIf the reports are true and C.C. Sabathia is indeed heading from Cleveland to Milwaukee, Indians general manager Mark Shapiro deserves a pat on the back.

Sabathia definitely needed to be traded for several reasons. Number one, he is going to be a free agent after this season and it was not likely that the Indians would be able to re-sign him. Since they were probably going to lose him anyway, it makes a lot of sense to trade him now and get something in return. Reportedly, the Indians are going to get big-time prospect Matt LaPorta and possibly more prospects from the Brewers for Sabathia.

 

Washington Nationals general manager Jim Bowden made a huge blunder two years ago when he decided not to trade Alfonso Soriano at the deadline despite the fact that Soriano was going to be a free agent. Bowden thought the Nationals would have a good chance to re-sign Soriano, but he instead took a big pile of cash from the Cubs. That left Bowden and the Nationals with nothing.

  • Written by MATT HAMMOND

Helping others — this is a farce

Jim MasonIn this day and age, taking responsibility for one’s actions seems to be the furthest from the minds of many.

If I were to build a $20 million debt while attempting to gain a job, I should be the one who meets that responsibility.

Hillary Rodham Clinton received a token gesture from Barack Obama, who has asked his top financial backers to help Clinton pay off her debt — $20 million. Obama and his wife even donated $4,600 as a step toward unifying the party — this is just precious if you ask me — not!

Why doesn’t someone say to our political officials there’s a lot of responsibility when running for public office — if they think this is OK, what will happen when they’re in office?

  • Written by Brooks Canavesi

Dunn doesn’t deserve shot from Blue Jays’ GM

Matt HammondAdam Dunn may strike out a lot. He may not hit for a high average. He plays a lousy left field at times. But the Reds’ slugger did not deserve the criticism lashed out by Toronto Blue Jays general manager J.P. Ricciardi.

Thursday night’s edition of Sportscenter on ESPN revealed some comments Ricciardi made during a radio call-in show. When he was asked whether or not the Blue Jays would be interested in Dunn, Ricciardi said Dunn “doesn’t like baseball that much” and he “doesn’t have the passion to play the game” among other things.

 

Dunn may frustrate Reds’ fans at times, but for him to be called out by the Blue Jays’ GM was way out of line. First of all, Ricciardi has enough problems with his team and should worry about those first. His Blue Jays are 35-39 and in last place in the American League East.

  • Written by MATT HAMMOND

Multi-partisan thinking needed in White House

Reuben MeesOver the past nine months, Sen. Barack Obama has repeatedly made two promises to the American public — change and unity.

With the Democratic primary looming close and his nomination as the party’s candidate sealed, it is time for him to start living up to those promises by announcing the person he will have as his vice-presidential candidate.

It’s becoming clear to a lot of people that Sen. Hillary Clinton — a remnant of her husband’s era that interrupted the Bush administrations — does not represent the kind of change Americans want. And having two Democratic senators on the ticket would not represent any real diversity in political ideology, although gender and race would be well reflected.

  • Written by REUBEN MEES